How to Make QuickBooks Enter Transactions For You

If you’ve already gotten OUR EBOOK: “How To Do A Year’s Worth Of Bookkeeping In One Day”, then you’ll probably already know how to do this step.  This excerpt is straight from that eBook with only a few modifications for those who haven’t read the book yet.

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Do you have a lot of transactions that repeat from day to day, week to week, month to month in your business?  What about repeating transactions that need to happen once or twice a month?  I’m sure you do.  After all, if you have to pay rent, or make a car payment, then you have a repeating transaction.  But what about invoices or sales receipts?  Do you bill any of your customers the same amount monthly, weekly, daily?  How about deposits?  Do you receive a specific preset amount of money on a timely basis (like an insurance payment, disability, social security, or just a flat fee for services rendered)?  What about vendor bills or credit card entries that are charged to your account every month?

All of these things, no matter how big or small, can be “Memorized” by QuickBooks.  In other words, you can set them up so that QuickBooks does the data entry for you.  It’s really easy.  All you do is set up the transaction as if you are about to enter it, then “Memorize” it.  Once you do, QuickBooks will automatically enter the transaction as a check, bill, invoice, deposit, etc., as soon as the date you preset passes.  Then, when you open QuickBooks after that date, you will be notified that the transaction(s) have been entered.  This one little step can save hundreds and even thousands of minutes in data entry time.

Here’s how to “Memorize” a Transaction in QuickBooks:

  1. Create your transaction, but do NOT press “Okay” / “Enter” / “Save and Close.”  (You can also pull up a transaction you’ve already saved if you don’t want to re-enter the information.)
  2. With the transaction open, Press Ctrl + M.
  3. The screen that pops up should look something like this:
  4. Choose “Enter Automatically”, then the frequency (weekly, monthly, quarterly, etc.) under the “How Often” section.
  5. Choose the next date you want the transaction entered (which is going to be the transaction for the NEXT month – Thus, you would choose February if you are entering January’s transaction).
  6. Choose the number of transactions remaining (which is useful for items such as car payments that are only paid for three years), and the number of days to enter the transaction in advance if you’re going to mail that transaction in the future.
  7. Click “OK” to return to the Original Transaction.
  8. Press Ctrl + Enter to Save That Transaction for THAT MONTH.
  9. That’s it.  The next time that entry needs to be entered, QuickBooks will enter it when you open the program.

Quick Important Note:  Once the transaction is Memorized, you can simply Close and then Reopen QuickBooks and QuickBooks will automatically enter ALL of those transaction from the first entry up to TODAY. That means, if you create an entry for January of 2007, but it’s May of 2010, this transaction will be entered multiple times until all of the transactions have been entered up until today’s date.  What this means for anyone who’s behind on their bookkeeping is that they only need to memorize one of each transaction and amount, then close and open QuickBooks to become instantly up to date.

Now go forth and take advantage of this fabulous tool. It will save you OODLES of time!

Let me know how it works for you.

Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper (Day 14) – The Carnage Begins

Well Diary,

Betty Bookkeeper HeadshotToday was the day… the FIRST day that I stole from the company.  Today, I forged my first check with the owner’s signature. I would have done it a couple days ago – as soon as I found out the owner doesn’t open the bank statements, and in fact expects me to do it – but the owner suddenly changed his pattern. Instead of staying out of the office, like he had done every day of the first nine days, he decided to stay in the office to “take care of some things.” Since I wasn’t expecting it, I decided to wait to see what it was he needed to take care of. Luckily, it wasn’t anything that had to do with me or the books.

Well, even if it did have to do with the books, he wouldn’t have found anything. I’m doing a very good job right now. After all, I have to prove my worth somehow.

I wrote the check for $100. I know, it’s not much, but it’s a start. Just something to see if he notices that I stole it. I’m sure he won’t notice since I took the check out of sequence. But if he does, I can say it’s for the Petty Cash Box that he doesn’t have. If he doesn’t notice… well then, I’m going to suggest he GET a Petty Cash Box. After all… “it makes MY job so much easier if we can have cash around for emergencies.” (If this was a video, then right now is where I would do the evil laugh…)

And there’s no worries about the bank clearing it.  Banks don’t have enough time to check every signature.

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To Stop The Carnage Caused by Forgery:

Unfortunately, when superhero_edited_no_maska bookkeeper forges a check, the only way a Small Business Owner is going to know is if they open the bank statements first.  And…the general rule is: He who opens the bank statement is the one who can hide or destroy the checks. So if an SBO opens the bank statement, they will get a chance to find the forged check before it can mysteriously disappear.

When yo do open the bank statement, check that all signatures are your signatures.  Take a second look at anything that was signed by a signature stamp or a doesn’t look like your signature.  Also, look for check numbers that are obviously way out of sequence or missing a check number because there’s a good possibility that it’s a forged check.

If your bookkeeper did cash a forged check, contact your bank and inform them that the check was forged.  Sometimes, they will be able to pull the funds from whatever bank account they were deposited in and put those funds back in your account.  But – more than likely – once the check has cleared, you can’t get the money back.  So be vigilant in opening the bank statement BEFORE your bookkeeper does.

Click Here to Read More Bad, Bad Bookkeeper Diary Entries

Laptop Features to Consider For Small Businesses

The following is an excerpt from our eBook, “How to Start a Lucrative Virtual Bookkeeping Business.”

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One of the things I see a lot of when it comes to bookkeeping is laptops…lots of laptops.  Some work incredibly well (whether for bookkeeping or anything else) while others work horribly.  Thus, I have compiled a list of features to consider when shopping for any laptop, whether for bookkeeping alone, or for business in general.

(If you have any further recommendations, please leave them in the comments so that other readers will know what to consider.)

  1. Must-Have Features For Your Bookkeeping Laptop:
    • A DVD Burner:  Don’t be cheap and skip the DVD burner in lieu of a CD Burner; they are not the same thing.  CD’s can only burn a fraction of the information a DVD can burn, and you will want to give your clients DVDs when you back up their work.
    • An SD Card Slot:  This will come in handy whenever you need to transfer digital files from a camera to your computer.  Although it may not make much sense now, you’ll be glad you have it later.
    • Bluetooth Access:  It just comes in handy.
    • Wireless Access: You will want to be able to get on the Internet anywhere, especially coffee shops.  In fact, you may even consider signing up for a monthly service from AT&T or Sprint so that you can get Internet access from the middle of a field, if you so chose.
  2. Optional Features For Your Laptop To Consider:
    • A 10-Key Keyboard:  The reason I have NOT made this a “Must-Have” feature is because this is actually a “Preference” choice more than anything.  Yes, it can be incredibly handy to have your 10-Key right on your keyboard when you open your laptop, but the problem is, a Laptop with a 10-Key Keyboard is a very heavy laptop.  It can add an extra 5 to 10 pounds of weight, and it can add a couple hundred dollars to the price tag.  If you buy this kind of laptop, you will also probably end up investing in a bag with wheels just to tote the thing around.  So now, you have a heavy laptop with a heavy AND bulky bag that you have to schlep from house to car to office and back.  On the other hand, you can buy a 10-Key Keypad that plugs directly into your laptop for a cost of $10 to $20, or a Bluetooth 10-Key Keypad for $30 to $40.  These are compact, lightweight, and can fit right in the pocket of any computer bag.  On top of that, you can buy a computer that weighs as little as five pounds, and now taking your computer with you is no longer a hassle.  So, make the decision for yourself on how important that 10-Key is before you buy a laptop.  (Notice, the Kensington keypad-with-calculator to the left has a calculator screen on it as well, which allows you to quickly tally numbers without having to access your computer.)
    • LightScribe Burner:  If you’ve never seen a Burnt LightScribe CD or DVD, you are missing out.  This feature allows you to burn any picture or text on the top of a certain type of CD and DVD, and can really give you (and your business) a very professional image.  Imagine giving your clients a Backup Disc with their Company Name, Logo and date on it.  You will convince your Clients you spend a lot of time and money to produce high-quality products, even when you don’t.  This feature does not come standard on all laptops, but is usually only $25 more if you’re buying a “custom computer.”  So, if you want to give an appearance of being Professional and “Tech-Savvy,” add this feature…you won’t regret it.  (Because quite frankly, if you’re not doing it now, your competitors will be doing it soon.)
  3. My Laptop Recommendations:

 

  1. AVOID AT ALL COSTS:  One of the benefits about being an Independent Bookkeeper is that you see a LOT of computers.  As such, I would NEVER recommend a Compaq (even though it’s made by HP) or a Gateway.  I’ve seen major issues with Compaqs, and I’ve heard Gateway has the worst customer service when a problem arises (this from a very computer savvy person).  Acers are super-cheap options, but there’s a reason for that…they won’t work well with a whole lot of business programs.  The IBMs I’ve seen have been heavy, awkward and incredibly expensive, but aren’t really any fancier than a Toshiba.  Dells are great because they’re inexpensive, you can customize them, and they have decent customer service, but I’ve seen more Dells freeze up than not and then you have to do a “hard reboot.”  But again, your laptop choice is always a preference thing.
  2. ALSO AVOID: Mini Netbooks.  While Netbooks are a fabulous deal price-wise, they are not good choices for a business.  For one thing, the keyboards are small, which makes it hard to type (and EXTREMELY curse-worthy if you type a lot).  For another, there are usually NO DVD/CD Burners, only USB ports.  And for a third, without a DVD drive, it is nearly impossible to get many computer programs on the laptop – including QuickBooks.  I have tried to download QuickBooks onto computers from the internet before, but even with the QuickBooks key code, you really need the disks to install the program.  So skip the Netbooks for your business and go with something larger.
  3. To find the best price on a laptop: If I don’t buy my laptop from the manufacturer’s website, then I like to go Best Buy or Office Depot.  They often have incredible sales and decent financing.  On top of that, you can usually take your computer to Best Buy if you need to get something fixed, and Office Depot now offers free computer check-ups whether you buy from them or not.  Check their catalogs regularly and you will be amazed at the deals.

BOOKKEEPING MONEY-SAVING TIP # 13: Make Money With Your Website (Part 1)

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Believe it or not, when I first decided to start my own business seven years ago, I did not want to do bookkeeping.  I may be good at it, but I’ve never LOVED it (not like my Mom does).  Instead, I wanted to make “just enough money” so that I could stay home with my newborn daughter, and maybe do a bit of romance-writing on the side.  If that meant busting my behind and selling Mary Kay products to support my family, I was going to do it (even if I am a bit of a Tom Boy).

But then I thought, why sell only one product line?  Why not sign up at as many consultant companies as I can so that I could sell more products at “in-home shows” then just one line?  Logically, I could make more money because I would have more products to offer.  So I looked into Weekenders, Party Lite, Pampered Chef, Tastefully Simple, Avon, and a few others who I can’t recall at the moment.  I was bound and determined to join them all, and then start my own website to sell all those products and make even more money.  Who cared if selling the products from a personal website was strictly forbidden by all of these companies.  There were legal ways around that (like not actually naming the products on the website, but having the catalogs available to download).  And with Yahoo!’s SiteBuilder program, building my own website turned out to be no challenge at all.

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Instead, life took me down another road.  Someone referred a new client to me, and I ended up running my own company doing bookkeeping, research, and office administration.  But even though life took me down another road…I still had my website…and I was supplementing my income with that website.  It didn’t take much to realize that anyone can make money with their website – the key is just knowing how to do it.
Since there are a lot of ways to do this, and since I have way too much information in my head, I’m going to turn this into a mini-series.  I will post at least two methods per week you can use with your site to make even more income.

Here are the First Two Things I did to Supplement My Business Income:

  1. Affiliate Income: I first started with Affiliate Income.  Affiliate Income is basically putting other company’s ads on your website and then making a commission every time one of your customers or readers buys a product through that ad.  That other company basically writes it off as marketing dollars or sales commissions, and then sends you a 1099 at the end of the year so you can report it as income.  They don’t pay unless someone buys, BUT…you can make a fairly decent-sized commission on whatever is purchased – anywhere from 1% to 30% or even a flat fee.  The best part is, you also make money on every order YOU MAKE through your website.  While this may not be income, to get an extra 30% discount on products you buy through your website can obviously increase your profits quite a bit. 
    1. a. My Recommendation: I like Commission Junction.  The account is free, and there are thousands of companies you can choose from, as well as individual products you can display.  It’s a nice way to expand whatever your inventory without actually carrying an inventory…and you can choose products that complement instead of compete with your company’s products (like products you might not want to carry because they are too expensive).  Just think about the things your customers ask you for that you don’t carry, and then join those programs.  That way, you can direct them to your website, and then make money just for recommending where they find what they’re looking for.
  2. Blogging – The New Door-to-Door Salesman: A few years and a few thousand dollars later, I was really wanting to see what else I could do to make money online.  After all, my website was up 24 hours a day and could make money for me even when I was asleep.  I began reading about “blogging,” and I thought, “How Stupid…who would want to read someone else’s online diary? BORING!!!”  (I know…the irony…because on THIS blog, I write “Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper.”)  But as time ticked on, I began to see that everyone has a blog – including businesses.  Not only does everyone have a blog, but there are tons of professional bloggers out there making six figures a year from just having conversations with their readers.  To top it off, it’s a great way for your readers and customers to get to know you on a personal level, which will make them more likely to purchase from you later.  In other words, it’s the newest way to do door-to-door sales without actually leaving your office.  So, I added a blog to my website, and began looking for advice on how-to write and what-to write.  Soon, I was making an additional income that has a bit of a “Snowball Effect.”  The income starts out small, but over time, those blogs keep working for you, and eventually, you end up making quite a bit of money from each blog.  So, if you would like to know more about blogging, start here: 
    1. a. What to Blog About: No matter what you do, you have a special knowledge base.  Maybe it’s bookkeeping; maybe it’s scrapbooking.  Maybe it’s even operating a forklift on a steep hill or how to screw your ex in court.  Whatever it is, you have knowledge to share.  The key is to figure out what excites you, and then write about that.  Because the more excited you can get, the more excited your readers will be.  (If you’re still stumped, write about the things you tell your customers – the “Must-Know Information” you impart when they come to you…) 
      1. i.      To get blog-post ideas, start surfing the forums on LinkedIn, Facebook and even Yahoo! Answers.  The questions you find there should be enough to inspire you.
    2. b. How to Blog: If you want to be a blogger, I recommend you start reading Darren Rowse’s blog, ProBlogger.net.  He is my guru, and his book “31 Days to a Better Blog” is extremely helpful. 
    3. c. Where to Blog: If you want to start making money on your blogs right away, and getting people to actually come to your blog, there are a few places you can go.  I recommend the following sites.  (You may only make a few cents per month when you first start, but the more controversial or instructional your articles, the more money you will begin to make.) 
      1. GoFreelance.com
      2. Elance.com
      3. Triond.com
      4. Helium.com

Not only is blogging great for supplementing your income, but it also helps bring traffic and customers to your site.  So, if you don’t like to blog or want to blog, you can always get other people to blog for your site at places like EzineArticles.com.

So, there are my first two ways.  Come back next week for the next two.

BOOKKEEPING MONEY-SAVING TIP # 13: Turn Your Website into a Money Maker (Part 1)

Believe it or not, when I first decided to start my own business seven years ago, I did not want to do bookkeeping. I may be good at it, but I’ve never LOVED it (not like my Mom does). Instead, I wanted to make “just enough money” so that I could stay home with my newborn daughter, and maybe do a bit of romance-writing on the side. If that meant busting my behind and selling Mary Kay products to support my family, I was going to do it (even if I am a bit of a Tom Boy).

But then I thought, why sell only one product line? Why not sign up at as many consultant companies as I can so that I could sell more products at “in-home shows” then just one line? Logically, I could make more money because I would have more products to offer. So I looked into Weekenders, Party Lite, Pampered Chef, Tastefully Simple, Avon, and a few others who I can’t recall at the moment. I was bound and determined to join them all, and then start my own website to sell all those products and make even more money. Who cared if selling the products from a personal website was strictly forbidden by all of these companies. There were legal ways around that (like not actually naming the products on the website, but having the catalogs available to download). And with Yahoo!’s SiteBuilder program, building my own website turned out to be no challenge at all.

Instead, life took me down another road. Someone referred a new client to me, and I ended up running my own company doing bookkeeping, research, and office administration. But even though life took me down another road…I still had my website…and I was supplementing my income with that website. It didn’t take much to realize that anyone can make money with their website – the key is just knowing how to do it.

Since there are a lot of ways to do this, and since I have way too much information in my head, I’m going to turn this into a mini-series. I will post at least two methods per week you can use with your site to make even more income.

Here are the First Two Things I did to Supplement My Business Income:

1. Affiliate Income: I first started with Affiliate Income. Affiliate Income is basically putting other company’s ads on your website and then making a commission every time one of your customers or readers buys a product through that ad. That other company basically writes it off as marketing dollars or sales commissions, and then sends you a 1099 at the end of the year so you can report it as income. They don’t pay unless someone buys, BUT…you can make a fairly decent-sized commission on whatever is purchased – anywhere from 1% to 30% or even a flat fee. The best part is, you also make money on every order YOU MAKE through your website. While this may not be income, to get an extra 30% discount on products you buy through your website can obviously increase your profits quite a bit.

a. My Recommendation: I like Commission Junction. The account is free, and there are thousands of companies you can choose from, as well as individual products you can display. It’s a nice way to expand whatever your inventory without actually carrying an inventory…and you can choose products that complement instead of compete with your company’s products (like products you might not want to carry because they are too expensive). Just think about the things your customers ask you for that you don’t carry, and then join those programs. That way, you can direct them to your website, and then make money just for recommending where they find what they’re looking for.

2. Blogging – The New Door-to-Door Salesman: A few years and a few thousand dollars later, I was really wanting to see what else I could do to make money online. After all, my website was up 24 hours a day and could make money for me even when I was asleep. I began reading about “blogging,” and I thought, “How Stupid…who would want to read someone else’s online diary? BORING!!!” (I know…the irony…because on THIS blog, I write “Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper.”) But as time ticked on, I began to see that everyone has a blog – including businesses. Not only does everyone have a blog, but there are tons of professional bloggers out there making six figures a year from just having conversations with their readers. To top it off, it’s a great way for your readers and customers to get to know you on a personal level, which will make them more likely to purchase from you later. In other words, it’s the newest way to do door-to-door sales without actually leaving your office. So, I added a blog to my website, and began looking for advice on how-to write and what-to write. Soon, I was making an additional income that has a bit of a “Snowball Effect.” The income starts out small, but over time, those blogs keep working for you, and eventually, you end up making quite a bit of money from each blog. So, if you would like to know more about blogging, start here:

a. What to Blog About: No matter what you do, you have a special knowledge base. Maybe it’s bookkeeping; maybe it’s scrapbooking. Maybe it’s even operating a forklift on a steep hill or how to screw your ex in court. Whatever it is, you have knowledge to share. The key is to figure out what excites you, and then write about that. Because the more excited you can get, the more excited your readers will be. (If you’re still stumped, write about the things you tell your customers – the “Must-Know Information” you impart when they come to you…)

i. To get blog-post ideas, start surfing the forums on LinkedIn, Facebook and even Yahoo! Answers. The questions you find there should be enough to inspire you.

b. How to Blog: If you want to be a blogger, I recommend you start reading Darren Rowse’s blog, ProBlogger.net. He is my guru, and his book “31 Days to a Better Blog” is extremely helpful.

c. Where to Blog: If you want to start making money on your blogs right away, and getting people to actually come to your blog, there are a few places you can go. I recommend the following sites. (You may only make a few cents per month when you first start, but the more controversial or instructional your articles, the more money you will begin to make.)

i. GoFreelance.com

ii. Elance.com

iii. Triond.com

iv. Helium.com

Not only is blogging great for supplementing your income, but it also helps bring traffic and customers to your site. So, if you don’t like to blog or want to blog, you can always get other people to blog for your site at places like EzineArticles.com.

So, there are my first two ways. Come back next week for the next two.

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Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper: Deletions and Voids

Betty Bookkeeper Headshot

Dear Diary,

Let me just premise this entry by saying — crap crap crap crap crap.

I got a phone call from the accountant today.  It’s tax time, and the accountant wants to meet with me to go over the books.  Since I’ve never worked with this accountant before, I have no idea how closely they are going to want to look at the books.  I can’t help but fear that the accountant is going to figure out what I’ve been doing if he looks too closely at the books.  So I was in full blown panic mode all day.Betty Bookkeeper Headshot

So after thinking about it, I did what I could today to clean up the books.

I started by voiding out some of the checks and deposits that I had made, hoping that would be enough.  But then, when I realized that the checks were recording in the check register as “voided checks”, I had to rethink that strategy.

My solution:  I began deleting the checks and deposits instead.  That way, they disappear completely from all registers.

But then another problem popped up.  By deleting the checks and deposits, the bank balance began to change.  So, I went back and made sure to delete just enough to keep the balance close to what the original balance was.  Hopefully, it will be enough to fool the accountant.

Hopefully the accountant is a fool…

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How to Spot This Problem:

superhero_edited_no_maskWhether you have a good bookkeeper or a bad bookkeeper, deletions and voids are always a part of bookkeeping.  Mistakes happen and bookkeepers have to find and correct those mistakes to make sure their books balance.  One of the biggest benefits and downfalls of various bookkeeping programs like QuickBooks (especially QuickBooks) is that many of the programs make it really, really, really easy to do voids and deletions.  In fact, just doing a “Ctrl + D” while in any facet of QuickBooks will instantly delete that item.

Having said that…let me point out that bad bookkeepers will do an excessive amount of deletions, especially after reconciling the bank accounts.  Finding those deletions and voids are an excellent way to know if there is a problem with your bookkeeper.

While I am not familiar with EVERY bookkeeping program, I do know QuickBooks.  And if you have QuickBooks, it is very, very easy to find those deletions and voids.

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QUICK NOTE:  Now if you do suspect your bookkeeper of embezzling, the easiest thing to do would be to take a previous backup and “Restore It” to your QuickBooks program.  By doing this, you wipe out any and all changes that might have been made.  This is NOT a good idea if you want to know what your bookkeeper might have changed.  Instead, make a backup copy of the current program before restoring anything else, that way you can always go back and look more closely at any changes that have been made.

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Now, if you do have QuickBooks, finding these deletions are super easy.  All you have to do is go to Banking – Reconcile.  By doing so, you will then see a screen like this one with a “Locate Discrepancies” button:

By clicking on “Locate Discrepancies”, you can see ALL CHANGES THAT HAVE BEEN MADE SINCE THE LAST BANK RECONCILIATION.  If the account has never been reconciled, then nothing will appear here, which indicates a whole other set of problems.  If the account has been reconciled, you can find a list of every change that has been made and what the change was SINCE THE LAST RECONCILIATION.

After you have your list, simply “Undo (the) Last Reconciliation” to see what deletions were made in the reconciliation period before that.  You can keep doing this all the way to the very first reconciliation, and thus get a a fantastic picture of what has been deleted, voided and changed without your knowledge and after the reconciliation.  Remember… excessive deletions, voids and changes can mean that there is a problem with the bookkeeper…not necessarily that they are embezzlers so much as that they make a lot of mistakes.  But again, keep in mind that all bookkeeping has a certain amount of small mistakes that are caught every month when the reconciliations are done.

Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper (Day 40) – Stealing the Boss’s Identity

Betty Bookkeeper Headshot

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I got a new credit card today. Well, technically, I got a new “company credit card” today. When the boss wasn’t around, I went ahead and called his credit card company and told them we had lost his company card and needed a new one. They asked me for all of the usual identifying information – social security number, mother’s maiden name, address, phone, account number, etc. – and of course, I gave the guy on the other end of the line all of that information. I then told him that I wanted to change the password question “because the last bookkeeper got fired, and we need to protect my boss’s identity.”

The guy at the credit card company didn’t even miss a beat – after all, companies get new bookkeepers all the time. “Which question would you like?” the guy asked me. “Do you want a question about your high school, pets, favorite cities…” and on and on and on.

“How about the question about pets,” I answered innocently.

“Okay. What is your pet’s name?” he asked.

I thought really quickly, then answered, “Moron.”

“Excuse me,” the guy on the phone said.

“My pet’s name is Moron,” I repeated sincerely. What I wanted to add was – “and Moron’s my boss” – but I managed to hold my tongue… barely. It was so hard.

“Okay. Moron it is,” the guy said in a serious tone while clicking away at the keys on the other end of the phone.  “Anything else I can help you with?”

“Oh. I almost forgot,” I added. “Our office has moved. The address I gave you was for the old address. The new address and phone number is…” and then I gave him my home address and personal cell number.

Again, I heard clicking on the other end of the line as the poor dupe updated my boss’s “new information.” When he was done, he said, “You should get that credit card in the mail by…”, which turned out was today.

So, I swung by my house and checked the mail during lunch. The card was already there. So I went ahead and treated myself to lunch – on the boss, of course. After all, he doesn’t pay me nearly enough for all the excellent work I do for him. And since the boss never opens the mail – especially that particular credit card bill– what he doesn’t know what hurt him.

I wonder what I’ll buy tomorrow… Maybe some new earrings. I’ve always wanted pearls…

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How to Prevent this Kind of Bookkeeper Theft:

You would not believe how incredibly frustrating it is to call into your credit card company and find out that all of your password information has been changed. Not only can your password info be changed, but some people even go so far as to change the “mother’s maiden name” question. Of course, the simplest way to stop this is to catch it early. You can do so by doing the following:

  • Open your credit card statements, or check your transactions online regularly. If anything seems questionable – no matter how small or large – call the credit card company immediately and ask them how many cards they’ve sent out. You can also verify that your security information is still what you originally created.
  • If they tell you your password information has changed, be sure to throw a high holy conniption fit and demand to speak to an account manager or “their boss.” Get this account closed immediately because whoever has your card can still make purchases even while you’re on the line. They will send you a new credit card with a new credit card number within a matter of days.
  • Get copies of your three credit reports as soon as you possibly can because – quite frankly – if your private information has been changed, there’s nothing to keep them from signing up for more credit cards at vendors you may never even have heard of. But, the good news is that every single one of those stolen cards will show up on your credit reports!, but not always all three of the reports, which is why you should spend the extra money to access all three. (In fact, for $14.95 a month at Transunion, you can actually access those three reports and credit scores for free every month. It may be worth it if you ever find yourself a victim of identity fraud.)
  • If a credit card company calls you and says there is questionable activity on your account, get online immediately and see what they are talking about. If they are contacting you, they are probably seeing something they’ve never seen on your account before. So even if you have your credit card on you, it never hurts to double check whatever charges they’re concerned about.
  • And lastly, make sure you know where ALL cards are at all times. I once had a client who ordered a card for his wife – a card which never arrived. It turned out, someone stole it from his mailbox and was shopping with it in the next town and my client never knew. Luckily, I caught it with the very next credit card statement when I asked for receipts that matched the charges, and we realized immediately what had happened. So even though the thief had managed to steal more than $7,000 in 15 short days, my client was not liable for a penny, especially because he disputed the charges right away. (Which is another good reason to check those statements every month.)

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Click Here to read the Previous Entry: Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper (Day 30) – The Double Payday Scam

Click Here to Read the Next Entry:  Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper (Day 55) – The Sister Company Scam


Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper (Day 30) – The Double Payday Scam

Dear Diary,

Today was payday – the second since I’ve been here.  I figured it was about time to test the Double Payday Scam – to see if my boss would actually catch me.

So, I started the day by doing the Payroll.  Just like two weeks ago, I created and took all of the paychecks to the boss to sign.  He signed them, with only the occasional request to see a corresponding timecard…then he signed mine without question.

I took the checks back to my office and set mine aside.  Then, I printed up another paycheck that I took back to him.

“What’s this?” he asked me, glancing briefly at my double payday.

“It’s a replacement check.  I double-checked my income and realized that I had entered my withholdings incorrectly, and QuickBooks took out too much in taxes.  So I voided the other one and reprinted this one.”

“Okay,” he said, shrugging and then signing my check.

And just like that – Double payday.  If he had asked me to produce the voided check, I would have gone back to my office and voided the first check… but since he didn’t, he’ll never know.  Even if he opens the bank statement (which let’s face it, he probably won’t), he’ll see the extra paycheck and think he’s just looked at the same check twice.

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How to Catch the Double Payday Scam:

All a small business owner has to do to catch the Double Payday Scam is to ask to see the voided check, or to insist that you will void all checks personally.  They can then refile the checks, and you have protected yourself… it’s that simple.

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Click Here to Read the previous entry:  Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper (Day 14) – The Carnage Begins

Click Here to Read the Next Entry:  Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper (Day 40) – Stealing the Boss’s Identity

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Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper – (Day 9) In the Clear

Betty Bookkeeper Headshot

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Dear Diary,

Well, it’s been a little over a week, and I would say I’ve got “the lay of the land.”   Apparently, the Owner wasn’t kidding when he said he’d be out of the office a lot.  I have yet to actually see him in the office for more than an hour a day.  He comes into the office in the morning to give his field guys their daily assignments, then he talks to me for about 10 minutes before he too heads out.  Right before he walks through the door, he stops and talks to the receptionist, telling her to forward all of his important calls and take messages on the less important ones.  Yada yada yada.  Everyday is the same.  (Which bodes well for me.)

Today though was a really good day.  Since the first day I got here, I’ve been the sole person in charge of the mail.  And that mail comes to me unopened.  Today, the bank statement came in.  I’ve been waiting to see if the owner would make an exception when it comes to the bank statement, but he just tosses it on my desk without even looking at it.  That’s a good sign for me.  That means when I start forging checks, he’ll never know.  Any checks that come back, I can shred before he gets them.

Man, I love working for “really busy” Small Business Owners.

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The Importance Behind the Bank Statement:

To many, choosing the person that opens the bank statement is unimportant.  But here’s the General Rule:  He who Opens the Bank Statement First is the One Who Can Steal the Most Without Getting Caught. That means, if it’s the bookkeeper – who has access to the checks – you are BEGGING them to steal from you.  If it’s the receptionist, that receptionist may end up in cahoots with your bookkeeper to steal from you.  But if it’s You-the-Small-Business-Owner, you can catch theft as soon as it happens.  So be smart… open the bank statement first every time.  Even if you don’t look for theft, it’s often enough to dissuade thieves in your company from stealing bank funds.

Diary of a Bad, Bad Bookkeeper: Paypal

Betty Bookkeeper Headshot

Dear Diary,

Betty Bookkeeper HeadshotToday I got an intriguing email.  The email was a confirmation from PayPal.  It said that we had spent $150 on an online order.  Since the company does not have a PayPal account, I knew it was a scam – a Phishing Scam, where some con artist is trying to get access to our account.  When you click on the links in the email, you are taken to a fake PayPal page where you are encouraged to log in and verify the purchase (or deny it), and then the fake website captures your real log in details and the con artist can then empty out your PayPal account.  Any good back office person knows – you never click on links in emails from financial websites (because it’s easy to “cloak” the website links).  You always go directly to the original website and log in there. 

Obviously the PayPal notice was a con…but it got me thinking.  Our company does not have a PayPal account…but we could.  It only takes a few minutes to set up, and then you can make payments from any checking account or credit card account that you link to it. 

So I opened one. 

Then, I went online and made a purchase to Office Depot. 

When I checked the bank balance online, I saw that the payment was debited as a PayPal account to Office Depot.  As far as I’m concerned, the explanation from the bank is simple enough to satisfy the boss.  Now, I don’t need to forge checks unless I really want to. 

Now the only question is…what should I buy

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In this mini story, there are actually two cons I’ve brought up:  The Phishing Scam and The PayPal Weak Link. 

The Phishing Scam is an actual scam where a thief sends a fake email encouraging you to click on the link in the email.  By doing so, they can capture your login information and then clean out your bank accounts.  PayPal Emails are the most common financial cons.  After PayPal, sending emails from banks would be the second most common way con artists get information from their victims.

There are three easy ways to spot these scams: 

  1. Banks and financial institutions have standard, precise emails already created that always use the same verbiage.  Phishing emails, on the other hand, often have misspellings and/or sentences that don’t make sense.  If anything doesn’t seem right with any financial institution’s email, it probably isn’t from your financial institution.   
  2. When you open the email, you will see the “From” address is not necessarily from the financial institution it claims to be from.  Whatever is after the “@” sign is the website address.  Anything in addition to the normal address probably means the email is a scam.  (For example:  …@paypal.fakesite.com or …@fakesite.paypal.alerts.com.)  Both the paypal.fakesite.com and the fakesite.paypal.alerts.com are completely fake because whatever comes before the .com is the site.  That means, these sites would be fakesite.com and alerts.com…not PayPal.com.   
  3. And finally, banks and financial institutions openly encourage customers to NOT click on links from their emails because Phishing Scams are so common.  Instead, they will tell you to go directly to their actual website to log in so that you can verify if the email is from the bank or not (and thus the alert is fake or not). 

Also, it’s common to get emails from banks you don’t even have an account with.  If that happens, obviously you can ignore those…but if you are concerned that an embezzler has opened an account in your name, just print out that email and go down to the bank to see if you have an account or not. 

AND when in doubt – go directly to the source…never click on the links in an email from a Financial Institution. 

As for the second con – The PayPal Weak Link: 

It is very, very easy to open a PayPal account and link it to a checking account…any checking account.  PayPal has a very simple verification process, which means that creating a PayPal account is easy for anyone with access to your checking account information, including your bookkeeper.  From there, it is very easy to steal money because PayPal and the bank account link together in order to create instant money transfers.  Plus, money can be sent to anyone with another PayPal account, and everyone takes PayPal these days (including airlines and other travel agencies), so stealing becomes very easy.

Therefore, to protect yourself from someone linking a PayPal account to YOUR checking account, you need to link it first.  In other words, you need to be the one to create a PayPal account with your checking account.  PayPal only allows a checking account to be linked ONCE, which means no one else can use the checking account information.  Once you have linked it, keep that information to yourself.  There’s no need to share it with your bookkeeper or anyone else because business’s should stick to using Bank Bill Pay and writing checks…Period.  PayPal should only be used by one person…the creator of that account.

Thus, if you don’t have a PayPal account, start one immediately in order to protect your checking account.  If PayPal does NOT let you create a PayPal account, then an embezzler has already linked to your checking account, and you need to consider closing it.  This is one of those huge companies that you just can’t avoid, and you really shouldn’t avoid. 

How to Brand Your Business

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The following is another excerpt from our newest eBook,“How To Start A Lucrative Virtual Bookkeeping Business,” which will be officially launched tomorrow – June 30th, 2010.  I realized that although the book is largely about starting a bookkeeping business, I’ve actually put some of my best business advice in the book as well.  Today is the last day to get it for 50% off, and be entered to win the 8GB iPod Touch, because once it’s launched the price will be $29.90.

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This is the E.T. Barton Brand Logo

In business, branding is putting your mark on everything you own.  Some brands are logos or pictures that are easily recognizable – like the Nike’s checkmark logo.  You see that logo and you immediately think, “running shoes.”  McDonald’s Golden Arches is another recognizable brand.  When you see that logo anywhere in the world, you immediately begin salivating for French fries and a Big Mac.  Some other obvious brands are the AT&T bars, the Wendy’s Fast Food red-haired girl, and the castle in the Disneyland logo.  People just have to see these logos and they know what they are, even if there are no words with that logo.  On the flip side, if you even say the words Disney, AT&T, Nike or McDonalds, those logos immediately pop into your head – largely because the name and logo are branded together.

So in case I’m not being clear enough, branding can be described as a logo, a catch phrase, a song, an environment, a reputation, or even a style, all melded into one solid, memorable element intended to “brand” a company into a customer’s mind.  Its purpose is to generate a feeling or a belief within a customer simply when they come into contact with the business or business product.  When used correctly, it catapults a company into the top echelons of their market.  And when you use it correctly, it can make you the Go-To Business in your area, your industry, and possibly even on the Internet.

Having done my spiel (i.e. monologue) about what branding is, let’s look at what you can do to brand your business, and therefore your product, so that you and your company will become memorable.  You want your brand to cross all channels of branding so that your business really sinks in with your clients.

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Now, if you already have a business name, some of the following information can still be of help to you.  However, if you don’t have a business name yet, consider ALL of the following things as a package before you choose a name.  If you think of the following items as interlinked elements, you will be much more successful at creating a brand then if you “winged it” right from the beginning (i.e. just dove into the deep end while holding your breath).  Here are the things you need to consider as a whole when creating your brand:

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  1. Naming Your Business: What name have you chosen for your business?  Does it relate to your name, your location, or your industry?   Is it an easy name to remember or a difficult one?  Is it easy to spell?  Where will it be located in a phone book or directory?
  2. Choosing a Logo: What image can you select that would represent your chosen business name, your industry, your office location, etc?  What pictures relate to the business name you have chosen?  Is it an attractive logo?  Is it easily recognizable, or does it look like another companies logo?  Is it a standard logo or a custom logo?
  3. Creating a Catch Phrase: Have you ever heard of an Elevator Pitch?  It’s a common phrase in the Mary Kay world, as well as the publishing world, because it’s based on the premise that you have to make an impression on your customer in less than 30 seconds.  You have to spout off something witty, funny, or philosophical in the time it takes to ride an elevator.  Therefore, thing about what phrase, expression, song or rhyme you can come up with and deliver in one sentence (for your business cards and website), or in one elevator ride. 
  4. Selecting a Website or Blog Domain: Is the business name you want available as a website domain name?  Is the domain name easy to spell?  Can you get the “.com” version of the title, or do you have to go with some less popular domain like “.org” or “.net?”  Is there any related names you can choose instead?
  5. Your Email Address and Signature: Once you choose your website, you want your email address to reference that website so that people can easily remember your address if they need to contact you.  For example, ETBarton@OneHourBookkeeper.com is easier for people to remember when finding me then etnsuz@yahoo.com, which is my personal email.  I usually answer people from the etnsuz address because it is my main address, but it is very difficult for people to remember that address, while the first one is much easier.  I’ll admit, it is a difficult name to remember, but when I created etnsuz, I was traveling with my friend Suzanne.  We created ETnSuz together so that anyone we met would remember us as a unit and write to us at one site – a yahoo site.  However, Suzanne never checked the email, and when our travels were over, it became my personal email.  I use etnsuz as my brand across all sorts of social networking sites, even though ETBarton is easier for people to remember.
  6. Your Name or Pen Name: For anyone who’s ever read the “About” section on our website, they know that I like to keep my thumb on the pulse of the publishing industry.  In fact, I am an active member of a national romance writers group (RWA), as well as a board member of my local chapter.  One of the funniest things about being in a romance writer’s group – besides getting to read a lot of kinky love scenes – is the names.  Everyone in the group has a pen name, including me, and some even have multiple pen names.  Obviously for me, my mother did not name me E.T., but Erica.  Yet, in my romance writer’s group, people know me as Talia Clare.  Both E.T. Barton and Talia Clare are brands I am creating for my ideal customers – which are my readers.  I write business articles, credit articles, and bookkeeping articles as E.T. Barton and I publish them in various places on the internet.  I write Historical Romance, Mainstream Romance, and Writing Advice articles as Talia Clare.  I also write my father’s memoirs under Erica Hamilton, my maiden name and his last name.  Therefore, when someone sees how I published any blog I write, they will know exactly what type of article that article is going to be.  In this way, you too can brand your personal name into a pen name or catch phrase of sorts that is easy for your customers to remember.  In the same way, you can use your name or nickname as a marketable brand.
  7. Your Mission Statement: You may think you don’t need a mission statement – and maybe you don’t – but you should at least have a goal in mind for your business.  What exactly is it that you are hoping to do?  Are you simply hoping to make money and be independent?  Or do you have a particular client-type in mind?  Are you looking to make yourself a niche-bookkeeper, someone who works in one particular industry…like construction, retail, restaurants, or maybe for used car lots.  If you can come up with at least one solid sentence that states what you hope to do with your company, you can use that as a part of your brand.

There are many other elements you can use to brand your company, but these 7 are the main ones that are easiest to manipulate.  By combining them together, you can create something memorable that will promote your business to even further success.

Once you do come up with a brand strategy, tell us what your brand is in the comments.  That way, you can inspire other people as well to create a brand that works for them.

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