The Email Subscription List

EmailOne of the best things that any business can do is to generate an Email List, especially, an Email SUBSCRIPTION List.  With an email list, bookkeepers can email invoices and sales receipts to customers.  Even better, the advertising department (or person) can use an Email Subscription List to send out advertisements to customers and thus generate additional sales.  If nothing else, having an email subscription list gives a business an opportunity to remind customers that they exist – that they have products that might interest the customer at any time of year, and to offer extra incentives for getting them to “come in” to the store.  Having an email list, you can save hundreds and thousands of dollars on advertising while still making sales.

To further drive this point home, I am going to use a quick example from the blogging world.  in the blogging world, there is a saying that is repeated over and over again.

That saying is:  “There’s money in the list.”

Some bloggers will even go so far as to say, “Your list is like an ATM machine.  When you want money, you go to your email list and send out a sales email, then Boom!  Instant Cash.” 

You see, in the blogging world, bloggers believe that you don’t need a thousand customers to have a profitable blogging business.  All you need is a few loyal customers that you can sell to again and again.

The same holds true for the business world.  When you need to up your sales, send out a “Special Sale Email” to your list and watch your bottom line take a jump.

So how do you go about building an email subscription list for your business?

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Here are five strategies to get you started: 

  1. Email Subscription Company:  If you have a website and you sell products online to customers all over the country, then the first thing you will want to build a successful subscription list is to subscribe to a company like Aweber or GetResponse.  These companies can help you subscribe and have your customers “Confirm” their subscriptions so that you aren’t marked as “Spam”.  As an added bonus, when subscribers “Confirm” their subscriptions, then you know that those people WANT to be contacted about your specials and other news.  Aweber and GetResponse handle all of those steps, and all you have to do is set it up, and then send out the occasional “Broadcast.”
  2. imageA Widget On Your BlogIf you have a blog or website, then you should have what is called a “Widget” on your blog that encourages people to join your email list.  It is a very simple way to capture email addresses, and you can make custom widgets from your Email Subscription Company.  If you don’t opt for the Email Subscription Company, then you can use a “Plug-In” from your blog site to create a list.  Our Custom Aweber widget looks like this (just to give you an idea):
  3. The Fishbowl:  This is a trick that is commonly used in the Mary Kay world to get leads and contacts.  The consultant basically puts out a fishbowl whenever they do a special event, then they encourage potential leads to fill out a mini-questionnaire with phone numbers and email addresses.  The same can be done for any business.  A simple $2 fishbowl right by the register, along with a mini-questionnaire about customer service or a request for email addresses is often all that is needed to get the email address.  Just make sure to put “Would you like to be notified by email about our specials?” on that min-survey so that you only email the people who are receptive to it.  (Another way to do this is to just have a “Guest Book” or sign up sheet near the register, and ask every customer if they would like to join your list as you make a sale.)  [ad#Leaderboard]
  4. The Free Lunch: Something that goes very well with the fishbowl is the “Free Lunch” prize.  Of course, if you aren’t a restaurant, then you don’t want to offer a free lunch, but you can offer anything from an “Instant Discount” to a monthly promotional product (that maybe you got for free from a vendor).  Basically, you’re offering a bribe for their contact information.  The nice part about this, however, is that they don’t have to fill out a form.  They simply small salad with limedrop in their business card.  It saves you a bit on printing out surveys, and still gets you the contacts.  Only downside is that you spend a little bit of money in order to give those monthly prizes, but the upside is a list you can sell to again and again.
  5. The “Freebie” Bribe:  For online sites, the “free lunch” is known as a “Freebie” and it is also a bribe that goes with “getting the contact info.”  This bribe usually comes in the form of a digital product, like an informative ebook (ie PDF file), an audio interview, an informative video, etc.  This kind of giveaway is fantastic for anyone who has a Subscription List with Aweber or GetResponse, especially because these companies will send out the freebies for you.  It is a huge timesaver, and is often worth the $20 fee to maintain.  (Again, remember that this is a chance for you to make a ton of money by emailing your customers over and over.)

Once you have your email list – whether its 20 people or 2,000 – you then begin making additional sales right away.  BUT, if you don’t go with a Company like Aweber or GetResponse, then you NEED to make sure you don’t become a Spammer.  Sending out mass emails can make the email companies mark you as Spammers, as can ignoring your readers requests to be removed from your email lists. To avoid these things without a list, read my old article entitled:  How to Send an Email Blast Without Getting Spam’d.

There are plenty of other ways to get email subscribers, but these are just a simple view that can be implemented immediately.

What are your favorite ways to get email subscribers?

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The SpongeBob SquarePants School of Business

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Okay, I have a confession to make:  I am a Mom.  Even worse, I am a Mom with a Toddler.  What that means is that as a “Mom with a Toddler,” I know all the words to “Elmo’s World.”  I also know how to “Do the Pigeon” and that “C is for Cookie” (which is good enough for me).  I know how to read Dora’s map, and I know Hannah Montana’s true identity.

What’s more… I know “who lives in a Pineapple under the sea.”

Why do I know these things, you may wonder?

Well, as any Moms with Toddlers will tell you, having a toddler means having some cartoon playing over and over and over again on the TV.  For a mom, that means no matter how much you try ignore your children or their shows, bits of information tend to sneak into your subconscious until suddenly you’ve realized that you’ve been singing “Absorbent and Yellow and Porous is he…” for the past hour without realizing it.

Which brings me to today’s blog lesson direct from The SpongeBob SquarePants School of Business…

What the Heck Am I Talking About…(Right?)

(Okay, there’s really no such thing as The SpongeBob SquarePants School of Business, but there may as well be.  After all, children all over the world are watching this show and learning from this energetically peppy cartoon.)

Recently, my toddler was watching all 99 episodes of SpongeBob for about the 50th time (give or take a dozen), and I mind-numbingly found myself watching one of the many, many episodes.  Actually, to be precise, I found myself watching Episode 88 (Episode 9 from Season 5) entitled “The Krusty Sponge.”  And as I watched this particular episode, I realized that it was quite brilliant in the very simple business advice it was offering.

The Premise

imageTo give a quick background on “The Krusty Sponge” episode, the mini-story starts when “The Krusty Krab” receives a visit from a food critic.  (The Krusty Krab is the restaurant SpongeBob works at as a “Fry Cook”).  The food critic in the story proceeded to trash everything about “The Krusty Krab” saying it was absolutely terrible…except for the food and the fry cook (SpongeBob).  The food critic then went on to say that if the owner of “The Krusty Krab” was smart, he would “sponge up” as much of what his cook had to offer as possible.

Thus, as cartoon’s tend to do, the business owner (ie, Mr. Krabs) took the advice to heart and went “way too far.”   Mr. Krabs pulled down “The Krusty Krab” sign and replaced it with a sign saying “The Krusty Krab.”  He then added in two new flavors of SpongeBob-themed condiments, a SpongeBob Mascot, a SpongeBob Train, SpongeBob napkins and even SpongeBob hamburger patties.

Eventually, all of these items backfired in a big way, and Mr. Krabs ended up getting arrested and brought before a judge for “poisoning his customers with the bad hamburger patties.”

The Lesson

Now, while I am a big advocate of using a theme in any business, of seeing the bigger picture and adding appropriate merchandise in order to increase profits, I could see right away where this business was about to get into trouble (even if it is only a cartoon business).  The big mistake that the business owner made in this situation was “taking his eyes off the prize.”  It is a common business mistake a lot of business owner’s make without realizing they are doing it.

Here’s what I mean:

imageIn the story, Mr. Krabs got so excited about his new SpongeBob theme, he made one really huge mistake.  He took SpongeBob off the grill and put him on the train.  (In other words, SpongeBob – the prized Fry Cook – was taken out of the kitchen in order to give “the kiddies” a ride on the new SpongeBob train…Mistake # 1.)  Then, Mr. Krabs gave SpongeBob’s kitchen duties to an employee who was unable to run the grill in the same way that SpongeBob could (Mistake # 2).  Finally Mistake # 3, Mr. Krabs sacrificed the quality of the one product that was praiseworthy – the product that brought the customers in.

imageObviously, I am bringing this up for a reason.  This is a common mistake a lot of business owners make in any business industry.  They see some exciting new trend coming along, and they re-vamp their business model to include the cool new product.  They forget about the one (or two or three) products that brought in the customers in the first place, and they end up weakening the overall business structure.  They take the advertising for their prized product and replace it with advertising for the new product.  This can have a negative effect in driving customers away instead of bringing them in – especially if the people looking for the Prized Product are not aware that the business still offers that Prized Product.

Examples

Just to really drive my point home, I will throw out some examples.

  • Imagine if McDonalds changed their fries to a new fry with the skin on.  Or, imagine if they used a different oil that changed the flavor of the fries.  Since McDonalds gives fries with every “Meal Deal,” and the fries are a part of their brand, it could go a long way in hurting their business.  People may start to go over to Burger King instead in order to get fries they are more used to.
  • Jim Carey switching from his classic comic bend to do a movie like “The Majestic.”  (In Hollywood, a move like that can kill an A-list actor’s career… luckily, Carey returned to his usual brand of comedy.)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio stepping back from the Romantic Hero role to pursue the Golden Globe and Oscar awards (meaning he went for the more dramatic and difficult to play roles).  While Leo remains an A-list actor, he no longer has the International Heart Throb status that he had after “Titanic.”
  • Eddie Murphy going from making R-rated movies to G-Rated movies.  It has completely changed the demographic of his customer base (ie, his fans).
  • Roller Derby in the 60’s went from racing and blocking to more violent hits.  Is it really a surprise that the sport died out by the 70’s?  I can honestly say, Roller Derby today is nothing like the original Roller Derby invented back in the 30’s.

Unfortunately, these are the only examples I can think of at the moment, but hopefully, it helps make my point clear.  Taking your eyes off the Prize of your business can really harm your business, or even drive away your clientele.  Learn from Mr. Krabs:  If you’re going to make a change in your business, keep your eyes on the prize.

The 10 Customer Service Rules that All “Big Businesses” Utilize

You may be wondering, “E.T. Barton is a bookkeeper and a researcher.  What the heck could she possibly know about customer service?  What qualifies her to teach a lesson like this one?  She’s ‘Back Office’ – NOT Retail.” 

Picture by thadz

SignTo be quite honest…I rock at customer service.  I mean, I seriously kick butt.  But that is not actually what qualifies me as a customer service expert.  What qualifies me is the fact that one of my very first jobs – back when I was in high school – was as a cashier at Carls Jr.  From there, I moved onto Cocos, Sears, JCPenneys, and eventually T.K. Maxx in Ireland.  (Yes, the T.K. is correct).  All of those companies had customer service training programs and many of them had “Secret Shoppers” to verify that service was up to company standards.  While at Carls Jr AND Sears, I happened to be hit by a “Secret Shopper” on at least five occasions and…as you can probably guess…I kicked butt.  I literally got 93% my first secret shop, and then 100% after that.  I got 100% on a Sunday Secret Shop at Sears (our busiest day of the week at the time) where I sold shoes on commission (and I happened to be the highest paid commission associate in my department).  I love the customer service experience, and quite frankly, it is one of the things I miss most by being a back office associate and an independent business owner…you just don’t get to serve the same type of customer service. 

A few years after working at T.K. Maxx, and intrigued by the Secret Shopping Experience, I became a Secret Shopper.  For approximately two years, I learned the Exact Scripts that fast food chains, restaurants, colleges, and even banks teach their employees in order to ensure the perfect customer service experience for their clientele – and to make sure that sales happened.  Big Businesses create these intense customer service training programs for one reason and one reason only: 

Customer Service = Sales. 

Bad Customer Service = Bad Sales. 

Excellent Customer Service = Sales Again and Again and Again as Customers Return For More. 

Good customer service is like being a shepherd with a flock of sheep…the Customer Service Rep must lead the customers to their ideal product(s) like a shepherd leading sheep to water.

Today, I’m going to share the basics that “Big Businesses” are using to create the ultimate customer service retail experience.  The following 10 Steps helps a Company’s Sales Person create a relationship with a customer from the moment they step in the door to the moment they leave.  That relationship will encourage sales more than anything else the store will have to offer – even more than the product itself.  (In fact, read this funny story about the most interesting customer service experience I ever received in order to get a better understanding of this concept entitled, How About Some Illegal Drugs With That Purchase?)

If you read nothing else on this website, bookmark this article.  You’d be amazed when you realize how employees should be treating customers (like you) and how they actually treat customers.  Once you know how Employees at Big Businesses are supposed to behave, you’ll want Excellent Customer Service everywhere you go.

To make things a bit simpler, I’m going to call Customer Service Reps “CSRs” from here on out.

The “Big Business” Basics of Customer Service: 

  1. HandshakeThe Meet and Greet:  In every customer service experience I’ve ever encountered, there is always a “Meet and Greet” time period that is mandated by big companies.  For retail departments like Sears and JCPenneys, a CSR is supposed to greet a customer within THREE MINUTES of strolling into a department.  At fast food drive-ins, it is within ONE MINUTE.  At banks, it’s supposed to be as soon as that door opens, or the customer gets into line.  It is always a good idea to greet a customer ASAP, even if the CSR is busy with another customer.  The greeting could be as simple as “deliberate eye contact” and a nod, but it is better to verbally speak by saying something like, “Hello – my name is…I’m with someone right now, but I will be with you in just a moment.”  (Especially a good idea if the CSR is on the phone.) This type of greeting is often enough to placate even the most demanding of customers.  If you have a grouchy old lady with a bad hip and arthritis demanding service now, she will often be more than happy to wait as long as she knows when she will be served. 
  2. The Inquiry:  After eye contact and/or a verbal greeting, a CSR needs to follow up with the basic inquiry:  “How may I help you today?”  If this question is never asked and a customer is left alone to “find” what they are looking for, they will most likely NOT find it, and they will leave frustrated.  Customers always want “easy shopping” and if a CSR does not offer to make their experience “easy”, they’re out of there.  Give them the opportunity to tell you what they need by simply asking. 
  3. Deliver the Product – NEVER Leave Them to Their Own Devices:  Once the inquiry has been made, it is very important to deliver the product to the customer.  Again, the goal is “EASY shopping,” NOT “Good-Luck-With-That Shopping.”   That means, if you are in a retail business, the CSR should LEAD the customer over to the product, pick it up and hand it to them.  In restaurants, food should be delivered in a timely manner.  In the service industry, a person’s word is their bond; a CSR should live up to whatever promises they make to the customers (within reason, of course).  After all, nothing frustrates a shopper as much as being told, “It’s on Aisle 5”, but then not being able to find that item amongst the multitude of other items in Aisle 5 – or having a restaurant hostess never come back with a drink order “because they thought the waitress delivered it.”  (Am I bitter?  Yes.)  Customers will often assume “It’s sold out” if they don’t see it (or they have been forgotten in the case of the restaurant), and they may or may not ask for further assistance.  By accompanying the customer to a product’s location and/or delivering a product, a CSR has the chance to make sure that sale goes through as it’s supposed to (or “check in the back” if the shelves are empty).   
  4. Ask if They Need Further Assistance:  More often than not, a shopper is looking for ONE specific item, and they will “browse” after they find their item…BUT, it never hurts to ask.  It’s just as common to have a  customer ask for something else once their first need is met.  By simply saying, “Is there anything else I can help you with?”, the CSR increases the odds of a higher final tally on the receipt, while also really pleasing their customer. 
  5. historical shoesSuggest a Complementary Product:  In any business, it is always a good idea to “Suggestive Sell” additional products, especially if the customer says, “I don’t need anything else.”  At Carls Jr., we were encouraged to ask, “Would you like fries with that?” for every meal that did not have fries.  At the Sears shoe department, we were instructed to bring out “at least three pairs of shoes” that were similar in style to the shoe being asked for.  (That way, if the customer did not like the first style / price / fit / etc., they had other options.)  In more than 75% of MY Suggestive Selling cases, I sold the additional product as well as the original product (which is why I was the # 1 Shoe Sales Associate).  It’s the Suggestive Selling that can really help a company’s bottom line, and make a customer happy.  The key, however, is to Give the Customer a Visual Suggestion of a Complementary Product.  At Sears, the customer was able to See AND Touch the additional shoes.  At Carls Jr, saying “Would you like Fries with that (or cookies, or soda)?” instead of “Would you like anything else with that?” gave the customer a mental image of the product, which led them to imagine the food in “their mind’s eye” (i.e. how it would taste).  By giving them that stimulus, whether actual or mental, the CSR stimulates a bigger sale.  
  6. Leave Them to Their Own Devices: After a customer has found what they are looking for, the CSR should back off.  Give the customer time to “browse” and “let their eye buy” more products.  Saying something as simple as – “Okay then…I’ll be right over there if you need anything else.  Again, my name is…just give me a holler” – takes the “buy more stuff” pressure off of a customer (which we all know is the goal) and allows them to relax and shop in peace.  The easier and more peaceful a shopping experience, the more likely the customer is to return to the store soon.  Plus, nobody likes feeling as if “Security” is following them around to make sure they don’t steal something.  Backing off shows a customer that they are trusted. 
  7. Check Back Periodically: Again, another important aspect of customer service.  Checking back within a certain time frame reminds the customer that they are cared about, and that a CSR is at their beck and call should they need it.  Think of it like a waitress in a restaurant.  How annoying is it to get your steak and fries, but there is no steak sauce or ketchup on the table?  Or how about when you’re ready to be “rung up” and the cashier is busy helping someone else.  By not checking back periodically, you deliver the message that the CSR got what they wanted from the customer – presumably a sale – and now they’re done with them.  So again, checking back reminds the customer that they are important every moment that they are in that store.  
  8. Touchscreen ComputerAsk For the Sale:  It’s amazing how many people never ask for the sale.  A commissioned CSR NEVER makes that mistake.  They know that if they don’t ask for the sale, the customer will wander off and find someone else to help them, or put the product back and walk out of the store.  By simply saying, “Can I ring that up for you?”, a CSR again announces that they are at a customer’s beck and call, and they get the chance to make the sale before the customer talks themselves out of it.  In the car industry, car salesmen know that once a customer walks off that lot, they probably won’t see them again (which is why they try so hard to make a great deal before the customer leaves).  Ask for the sale and you increase the chance of actually making it. 
  9. Suggestive Sell Yet Again:  Once a CSR is ringing up a purchase, they have a chance to see what products the customer is buying and suggest complementary products to a different item.  It’s that last minute, “Oh yeah, I should get that too while I’m here,” which can really be successful at increasing every sale.  That’s why the magazines and candy companies pay so much to be at the cash register – because they KNOW someone will think, “I should get that too,” right before they ring up the sale.  
  10. Happy BallThank Them For Their Patronage:  There is a restaurant I’ve been going to for fifteen years (one of my favorite restaurants of all time), and the manager has always said the same thing in all that time.  He says, “See you tomorrow,”…as if I am really coming back tomorrow, and as if he can’t wait to see me.  He even said it to me when I was just an obnoxious teenager.  I know he says it to everyone, but it still makes me feel important that he takes the time and makes sure he says it to me every time I go there (which is a lot).  This is the most important step of making a customer want to come back…common courtesy and the feeling like they matter to that business.  Too many CSRs never say, “Thank you.  Have a nice Day.  I hope I see you again soon.”  Instead, they move onto helping the next customer, inadvertently dismissing the customer standing in front of them.  My rule of thumb is this:  A friendly “Farewell” transfers good feelings from one person to another.  Why wouldn’t you want your customer to leave feeling good?  No matter what, make sure that customer leaves with a smile, and they will return. 

And there you have them.  The 10 Rules of Customer Service that the Big Businesses use.  If you want your customers to return again and again, you need to implement as many of them as possible.  Period.

Now go be a shepherd and lead your customers to their ideal product.